Wages in Malta: “€11 an hour – are you joking?”

 

The official statistic published recently by Eurostat that the average wage in Malta is €11 per hour (compared to €27 in the euro zone countries) has been met by disbelief and has also provoked an angry reaction among visitors to this site. One reader commented: “€11 an hour, are you trying to make fun of us?” A woman said: “The average wage of most Maltese workers is around €4 per hour. I wish my husband was on €11 per hour, we would be laughing not struggling like most people.”

Another reader said that the average statistic hides the reality of the different levels of income:  “This is another big fat lie. The managerial posts and those with a bachelor university degree get that rate otherwise it's less than half stated. The most common pay is around €5 - 6 an hour.”

Another reader agreed: “€11 an hour will translate to a €23,000 annual pay. Who earns such salaries? The average hourly rate of around 70% of Maltese earn €4 to 5 an hour. The hourly average is increased to €11 an hour because statistics include salaries of those who are paid extremely well including those who are attached with the financial sectors, e-gaming and “tal-Klikka” who may receive three salaries. So there is only a small percentage of Maltese who earn close to the €11 an hour let alone the European average of €27 an hour.”

Another comment was very similar: “€11 an hour? Another false statistic: €11.90 my boot!!! Ask Arriva workers, security workers, air transport workers, etc .it is around €4/5 per hour. Get your facts right please!!!”

And another: “The average wage has no true bearing of what the majority of workers are taking home. Our minimum wage is a meager €3.95 per hour – a far cry from the average of €11.9.”

A woman pensioner had this to say: “I pay my domestic help €6 and hour. Most people I know do. Physiotherapists, after 4 years study and even with 10 years solid experience abroad, are offered €6 or 7 an hour at Mater Dei and private clinics, an insult. But unless you work in a hospital first, where there are consultants, there is little hope of getting private patients. The average Maltese manages to live by working at 2 or 3 jobs and by making frugality a way of life. Most organisations pay a few people at the top a decent salary and one of their jobs is to keep the others from asking for better pay. This has become a take it or leave it society. Look around you. The place is full of Eastern Europeans who are happy to accept even less than minimum wage for what they do. They would rather be here, most of them women looking for a husband, than in their own often bleak and cold countries. The average Maltese worker has lost his/her rights.”

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Comments (17)

misluh bit taxxi ..

- Mon 20-Aug-2012, 18:48

DAWN JAFU XQEDIN JAJDU JEW ?? GHALFEJN MA JSAQSUX LILNA IL HADDIEMA TA EU U NAJDULHOM AHNA KEMM ANDNA PAGI HAWN MALTA, HALLI JKUNU JAFU FEJN NINSABU AHNA ... DEJJEM IHUFU FIJNA BIX JARAW ANDNIEX XI ROKNA BIX IKUNU JISTAW JIHDULNA MINNA ....

CCC

- Mon 20-Aug-2012, 17:27

Who ever wrote this article is obviously jelaous of eatern european women.

Karel

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 14:38

It does not make sense that salaries are suggested to be so low.
In the proposals we hear are being offered to fill the vacancies for the biofuels project in Malta where there are 140 jobs being called for to fill the needs there the propoosed average salaries are expected to be over €25,000-00 per year. This is the sort of project we need and if the Company wants to pay such salaries then it should be encouraged by this newspaper. Now with this proposal (reported in Bloomberg press last year) likely to create a second project in Gozo as well as Malta and the need there being a further 160 or more permanent people salaries will rise to these levels.
According to the press release last year the issue in jobs in Malta is that you target to get the best people by enticing them with decent salaries.
Such developments in Malta are encouraged by the Government but we haven't heard and are good for the community.
Let's hope therefore that these biofuels projects in Malta are started sooner rather than later as the beed is there.

J.Camilleri

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 14:16

Even with €11 an hour, it is a far cry from the €27 an hour paid as an average in the Euro zone country (less than half). So if we had to really take the real average which in my opinion is far lower than €11 an hour, what will be the difference from the average paid in Euro zone countries? And remember, currently most of the Euro zone countries are affected badly by the Euro crises and therefore, wages are lowered. So if as Gonzi said, we are not in crises, how come we still lave a much lower average pay? We have a huge difference now, that Euro is in crises, so what will be the difference when Euro will strengthen once again? Will the difference continue to expand? Will the average pay in Euro zone will be four, five, six times, more than that paid in Malta???

Karel Yurian

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 13:44

It does not make sense that salaries are suggested to be so low.
In the proposals we hear are being offered to fill the vacancies for the biofuels project in Malta where there are 140 jobs being called for to fill the needs there the propoosed average salaries are expected to be over €25,000-00 per year. Now with this proposal (reported in Bloomberg press last year) likely to create a second project in Gozo as well as Malta and the need there being a further 160 or more permanent people salaries will rise to these levels.
According to the press release last year the issue in jobs in Malta is that you target to get the best people by enticing them with decent salaries.
Such developments in Malta are encouraged by the Government but we haven't heard and are good for the community.
Let's hope therefore that these biofuels projects in Malta are started sooner rather than later as the beed is there.

cittadin malti

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 12:02

Kif anke tal-Eurostat qed jaghtuni l-impressjoni li huma hbieb tal-klikka ta l-oligarkija ta Gonzipn jew inkella qeghdin jghixu fil-qamar ghax sa fejn naf jien average rate per hour ma taqbiz ir-rata ta 4 euro is-siegha.Jekk ta l-Eurostat ghandhom provi cari li l-average rate ghal-haddiem Malti hu dak ta 11 euro is-siegha dan jaghmluh bid-dikjarar.Forsi qeghdin jirreferu ghal tal-qalba tal-klikka ta Gonzipn ghax dawk biss jista jkollhom din ir-rata ta hdax euro is-siegha mhux il-haddiem genwien ghaqli Malti.Ghalija ta l-Eurostat huma gidibien hu komplici ta Gonzipn.

subin kollha

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 11:41

Int Orajt jEwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww???
11euro lostja
xi 4 euri imdelkien
pjaga

joseph saliba

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 11:20

jekk hawn xi ministru li minghalih il-paga taghna il-haddiema hija ta 11 ewro fis sigha qieghed jghix fil-qamar ahna is-securities bit-3.50 ewro u qabel kont insuq il-cash van bir-riskju kollu li jgib mieghu kelli ewro 4 is-siegha u il-hin kollu msarnek f'saqajk minn xi hold up. nista nkun naf min qieghed jaghmilha din l-istatistika????????

BETTER FUTURE

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 11:11

Hej, Hej! Let us not forget the Public sector collective agreement of 2005 to 2010, that in just 5 years, increased the basic overall take of civil service workers by 70% overall (and all grades, from the lowest, were involved, not just the top). Concurrently, and in monetary sync, all other Governmental and authorities single and collective agreements were increased accordingly. And what about the extremely generous allowances which were awarded at the same time! OK, these are not pensionable and they are taxable (except vehicles which are very, but very, lightly taxed), but good God, they are there, and in copious quantities. Fully expensed cars for approx 15% of the sector's employees (others make do with car cash allowances and/or being driven round by ministry's vehicles), and petrol, and mobiles, and life insurances, and medical insurance and any other allowance you might come up with, and full price travel to all over the world for conferences, working groups and whatever excuse under the sun? This agreement rendered the public sector far more remunerative than the private sector. And with no real productivity safeguards, except the token few, ruined the Maltese economy in such a way that it will take tens of years to recover and to make the public sector efficient. It will take a miracle, a catastrophe or a revolution. Private sector workers carry all the employment risk and the heavy workload (all Malta knows how little the civil service produces) but get paid less for giving up job security. Two Maltas' indeed! Make you calculations using proper figures please!

TOTAL BULLSHIT

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 11:09


YOU KNOW WHO GETS EURO 23,000
PER YEAR? DIRECTORS IN THE
CIVIL SERVICE PLUS A CAR PLUS
PETROL AND MOBILE FOR FUCKING
ABOUT ALL DAY WITH FUTILE MEETINGS AND PRETENDING THAT THEY ARE RUNNING A DEPARTMENT THROUGH THEIR SUBORDINATES,SO THAT AT THE END OF THE YEAR WILL ALSO GET AN ADDITIONAL BONUS OF 15 PER CENT.

WHAT THE EUROSTAT IS STATING ON THE SALARIES IN MALTA IS
OTHERWISE TOTAL BULLSHIT.

DOES ANYBODY KNOW THAT IN THE
EU THE WORKERS ALSO GET AN
ADDITIONAL SALARY KNOWN AS THE
13TH MONTH. YES THOSE ARE THE
PAY CONDITIONS IN THE EU.

il-manina

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 10:51

Mhux li kien li ghandi hdax il-euro fis-siegha. Kieku ma' noqodx inhabbel rasi u nqancac minn paga ghall ohra!! Anqas il-kont ta' d-dawl u l-ilma ma' jinkwetani KIEKU!!Jekk din hi statistika mela allura id-dejn veru ta' Malta xi jkun?

PM DISONEST A1

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 10:50


Is-salarju ta GONZI u l-
hallelin li ghandu madwaru
ghandhom il pagi bhal ta l-
ewropa!!!

u dawn bil paga jittewbu.


joseph Mifsud

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 10:46

One has to know who is giving EuroStat this information. Everybody knows that the PN can take for a ride anyone as their history shows.

EU BLA SENS

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 10:39

Id-direttivi tal Unjoni
Ewropeja huma mmirati biss
biex dejjem jingabru t-taxxi.
Il-poplu Malti dawn kollha
qieghed jiblahhom.

L-Unijon Ewropean qatt ma tohrog xi direttiva biex il-
pagi ta Malta jkunu bhal dawn
ta Franza, il Germanja, l-Ingilterra etc. L-istandard
jekk ta kullhadd l-istess ikellha EU ma tghamilx sens.
Ara f'hiex jinsabu l-poplu
ewropej, f'xifer ta falliment.

Nixtieq naf dan il-gen kollu
x'kien biex Malta tidhol fl-EU.
Hlief tahwid monetarju u fallimenti m'inhiex nara.

.... u ta Malta stennew wahda
kbira ghax GONZIPN kollox qed
izomm mistur mill-poplu.

tony abela

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 10:31

We should stop talking about 'average'. It will be n better if the statistics shows the percentage of the population related to a set of bands, say 50% average hourly pay less than €6, 20% between €6 and €10, 10% €10 - €12, and so on. Then the statistics will make sense as it will probably show that 1% (Ministers and Chairpersons) earn some €50 an hour or more.

Leo Briffa

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 09:54

I have been a physiotherapist for the last 26 years and I get Euro 7.40 per hour(see 3 patients in 1 hour)roughly translates into euro 2.50 per client (tal-lira)...this is why we are trying to get the government to raise our conditions, not that it will really increase our income by much but every little helps.

l fenech

- Sun 19-Aug-2012, 08:56

You are mixing up the salary of a minister plus perks to that of the man in the street plus taxes and bills.